Sandstone Monument Marks Burial Site of Five English Quarrymen

Vol. 6, No. 4 

The use of Medina sandstone to craft headstones was rather limited in the nineteenth century. County Historian C. W. Lattin has speculated that the common use of the stone for curbing and paving blocks made the durable material undesirable for such a noble purpose. In Orleans County, sandstone within cemeteries is often observed in hitching posts, carriage steps, and monument foundations. However, the presence of sandstone monuments became common among immigrant quarry laborers. The stone represented the livelihood of the deceased individual. It was readily accessible, often affordable, and on other occasions, a quarry owner might gift a slab of stone for use in the case of an untimely death. This particular monument at Mt. Albion Cemetery represents a rather unusual occurrence. Five English quarrymen are buried on this lot with this large, beautiful sandstone monument erected to their memory by friends and fellow quarry laborers.  … Continue readingSandstone Monument Marks Burial Site of Five English Quarrymen

The Mighty Oak Orchard

Vol. 4, No. 47 While digging through a box of negatives, I discovered this image of the Oak Orchard River and Marsh Creek from the 1920s. Absent from the photograph is the Route 18 bridge that crosses over the Oak Orchard, so at this point in time the little hamlet pictured here was known as “Two Bridges.” Thinking about the origin of names, a letter within the Department of History’s files provides some insight into the source of the Oak Orchard name. The letter, addressed to Samuel C. Bowen of Medina, is from Arthur C. Parker, the Secretary Treasurer of

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Communal Company Promoted Early Settlement in Carlton

A pioneer settlement as depicted in the Historical Album of Orleans County (1879) Vol. 4, No. 30 On September 10, 1810, eight men from Stockbridge, Massachusetts signed a contract binding one another to a settlement on the Holland Land Purchase in Western New York. These men were unsure of what they would encounter in the virgin woods of the Genesee Country where land was scarcely settled, and neighbors few and far between. When gazing upon the text of this agreement, the articles read like a manifesto built upon a foundation of communism. Now this is not to say that these

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Marsh Creek Span Completed Under Budget in 1922

Volume 3, Issue 38 This photograph, taken in the summer of 1922, shows the construction of the bridge over Marsh Creek at “The Bridges” in Carlton. Originally known as “Two Bridges,” the span over Marsh Creek predates 1861 when a committee was put in place to explore the replacement of the bridge. On November 29, 1861, Almanzor Hutchinson reported that $800 was available to replace the bridge over Marsh Creek and upon the motion of Mr. Abell, Daniel Howe was placed in charge of overseeing the replacement. The following day, for a reason unbeknownst to this historian, the Board of

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Enterprising man ran general store in Carlton, at site that later became Narby’s

Volume 2, Issue 49 At a time when trips into town took hours instead of minutes, the rural grocery and dry goods stores provided an essential an efficient service to those living in the country. This image shows the wagon belonging to Gifford D. Fowler, the owner of a general store at Two Bridges in Carlton. A native of Parma, Fowler was brought to Carlton as a young man by his father Benjamin who purchased the store in 1877 from Lemuel Palmer. For nearly ten years, Benjamin operated the store and it is extremely likely that Gifford worked for his

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